June 2018

Volume 3, Issue 2

Topic: New & Upgraded Facilities Codes

                  & Regulations

Focus: Ensuring Your New/Upgraded Facility

                  Meets Necessary Codes/Regulations;

            Starting Permitting Early;

            Lean Construction: Lower Cost;

            Biographies of New Cambridge Staff

PREVIEW:

INDUSTRY ARTICLE
Ensuring Your New/Upgraded Facility Meets Necessary Codes/Regulations

Understanding processes for different levels of jurisdiction will make a difference in the length of time devoted to the design and construction of your facility.

Jeff Eriks & Evan Williams

This article appeared in the May 2018 edition of Waste Advantage Magazine

Construction projects, whether they are new builds or upgrades, require compliance with federal, state, county and even local regulations. Each one of these entities may require different levels of approval and follow different processes. The earlier you involve the code officials in your process, the more likely you are to have a smooth transition through the stages of your project. These are many of the regulations and codes, different types of permits and the timelines that may be required.

Regulations and Codes

There are a patchwork of different policies, codes, best practices, requirements and laws that govern site development and construction. At the federal level, the ADA governs accessibility to and within a building. Every state has unique building code amendments and land use requirements. At the local level, municipalities and counties inject their own specific requirements.  These are often the most variable and include unique zoning and land-use requirements, local utility and connection requirements, bulk design and aesthetic requirements, as well as local customs and opinions/rules. What is essential to remember about code officers as a property owner? Code officials deal with these codes/rules/policies every day; it is their everyday reality and the responsibility of the property owner (or their developer and representatives) to either know all the requirements, or to engage project team members, who will involve the necessary parties to ensure that all of the requirements are being addressed.

Read more.

DESIGN-BUILD CORNER
Start Permitting Early

Read more.

LEAN CONSTRUCTION
LOWER COST

by Jerry Atwood, AIA, NCARB

The Lean Construction approach is adapted in part from lean manufacturing principles and practices.  Derived from the automotive industry in the 1980’s the philosophy of lean manufacturing removes everything which does not add value in the manufacturing process. While the mass production of autos is not a direct correlation with construction of a single building, techniques on how to manage production systems to minimize material waste, labor hours and shorten the schedule do apply in the generation of the maximum value. Some principals that do apply to the construction industry include:

Identifying Value from the Client’s Point of View. What the client truly values may go beyond delivering what is laid out in the plans and specs so understanding the client’s point of view needs to start by building a relationship with the client. Identifying client values should begin early in the pre-construction phase of a project to fully understand not only what your client wants, but why they want it so the project team can manage expectations and advise the client. Low bids that result in poor workmanship and performance will not be a good value from the client’s point of view. A deep level of trust must be established between all stakeholders to successfully implement lean practices.

Read more.

MEET CAMBRIDGE

Ray CavalieriDesign Project Manager

Ray began working for Cambridge in April 2018. He attended Iowa State University where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in Architecture and Eastern Illinois University for Engineering Studies. Ray has been working as an architect for over 20 years and is a member of the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards, Green Building Education Services, US Green Building Council, Association of Licensed Architects, American Institute of Architects, National Fire Protection Agency and International Code Council.

Click here to read more about Ray!

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Chris CaldwellAssistant Project Manager

Chris began working for Cambridge in April 2018. He attended the University of Texas, Austin where he earned his Master of Science degree in Engineering Management and University of Houston where he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Construction Engineering/ Management (Industrial, Oil, Gas, Petro-Chemical). Chris has been working within the construction industry for over 10 years within the chemical, industrial, renewable energy, retail and residential industries.

Click here to read more about Chris!

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Wendy LoyAccounting Administrator / Human Resources

Wendy began working for Cambridge in June 2018. She earned her Associates degree in Accounting from Sauk Valley Community College. Wendy has worked in the accounting department at construction firms for nearly 20 years.

Click here to read more about Wendy!

March 2018

Volume 3, Issue 1

Topic: Safety

Focus: Site Safety Details to Take into Consideration

                  before Breaking Ground;

            Safety at the Job Site;

            Lean Construction: Higher Quality;

            Biographies of New Cambridge Staff

PREVIEW:

INDUSTRY ARTICLE
Site Safety Details to Take into Consideration Before Breaking Ground

Tips for planning safety into a project while in the pre-construction phase.

Jeff Eriks

This article appeared in the February 2018 edition of Waste Advantage Magazine

Site safety is a major concern at project sites. Prior to beginning any project, the contractor, owner and design team need to fully evaluate the impact of the construction on the actual site itself as well as the surrounding areas.  The major topics we will cover in this article include the owner’s safety plan and requirements, the contractor’s safety plan, the municipality and/or traffic board requirements as well as other various factors that play into the design of the overall project safety plan. This needs to be a group effort to build and manage the plan—a single entity cannot complete an effective safety program by itself. Everyone has a different perspective/role and his/her input is invaluable to the design of the overall safety program.

Read more.

DESIGN-BUILD CORNER
Safety at the Job Site

  

Read more.

LEAN CONSTRUCTION
HIGHER QUALITY

by Jerry Atwood, AIA, NCARB

Applying Lean Manufacturing principles to the construction industry is difficult since most projects are one-off and will not be replicated thousands of times. Cambridge Design-Build applies the lean manufacturing philosophy1 of faster delivery, higher quality and lower price, through the use of time minimization, just-in-time material deliveries and our belief that quality products and systems must be built into the final product.

At its most basic level, construction quality is conformance to specifications. Quality of design and conformance to specifications provide the fundamental basis for managing the delivery of a deficiency-free project.2 Owner involvement is the best quality assurance mechanism because it combines two critical forces: (1) Are the quality tools and metrics deployed appropriately to the Owner’s needs for quality? (2) Does the final deliverable reflect the owner’s changing views of a quality product or service as the owner see’s it now?

Read more.

MEET CAMBRIDGE

Dena SamoskaController

Dena began working for Cambridge in January 2018. She earned her Bachelor’s of Science, Finance from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Dena has worked in the accounting department
at construction firms for nearly 20 years.

Click here to read more about Dena!

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Randy BaggettSenior Project Manager

Randy began working for Cambridge in February 2018. He attended Texas Tech University where he majored in Business Administration. Randy has been working in the construction industry managing and directing the construction of healthcare facilities, commercial, institutional, and municipal projects for over 20 years.

Click here to read more about Randy!

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Brad EricksIT Manager & Operations Support

Brad began working for Cambridge in December 2017. He earned his Bachelor of Science, Business Administration and Bachelor of Arts, Computer Science from Trinity Christian College. Brad has worked in the IT and construction industries for over 23 years.

Click here to read more about Brad!

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Julia MooreContract Administrator & Operations Administrative Assistant

Julia began working for Cambridge in January 2018. She attended Indiana State University, was the Chairman of Special Events for Union Board, is a Board Member of the youth group at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, and is fluent in American Sign Language.

Click here to read more about Julia!

Contact CambridgeContact us today!