Cambridge Companies contributes and participates in design and construction related articles within the waste industry.

View articles, press releases, and advertisements from 2016 below.

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Teamwork Exemplifies Best Projects
ENR Southwest│ October 25, 2016

The ENR Southwest Best Projects competition has been recognizing achievements in construction for nearly two decades. Some developments, such as new and improved technologies, have changed the industry during that time, allowing projects to be built better and faster.

But some things haven’t changed—namely, the need for teamwork. This year’s winners were driven by teams with a passion for working together. Almost every team, from the massive T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas to the relatively small Horse Mesa Dam outside of Phoenix, cited teamwork as the most important factor for success on their projects. Whether that translated into finding ways to make more than 1,000 work as one, or a mere handful of experts finding solutions to potentially dangerous work, that kind of work impressed this year’s judges.

Eight judges reviewed more than 75 projects completed between June 1, 2015, and June 30, 2016. The panel included: Andrew Baird, project manager, Kimley-Horn; Arnold Canales, principal with ARC Consulting; Pat Edwards, principal and regional manager, Burns & McDonnell; Kai Kaoni, assistant professor of practice at Northern Arizona University; Corey Newcome, division manager, Las Vegas Paving; John Take, senior vice president, Stantec; Craig Randock, design leader, DLR Group; and Bill Sabatini, lead design principal, D/P/S.

The jury rated the projects based on five criteria: overcoming challenges and teamwork; safety; innovation and contribution to the community; construction quality and craftsmanship; and the function and/or aesthetic quality of the design. 

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  • ENR Southwest
  • Best Energy/Industrial Project
  • Southern Nevada Recycling Center

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Energy/Industrial Best Project – Southern Nevada Recycling Center
ENR Southwest│ October 24, 2016

Southern Nevada Recycling Center
North Las Vegas, Nev.
Best Project


Owner/Developer Republic Services

General Contractor Cambridge Cos.

Lead Design Firm Ed Vance & Associates

Structural Engineer Larson Design Group

MEP Engineer Larson Design Group


As the largest single-stream recycling facility in the U.S., the $34-million Southern Nevada Recycling Center located on an 18-acre site in North Las Vegas, Nev., took six months to design, another six months to obtain permits and 12 months to build.

The 110,000-sq-ft recycling center, which wrapped up construction in November 2015, can handle 70 tons of material per hour. Designed to blend into the Mojave Desert environment,  the structure stands 40 ft tall to provide clearance and features translucent panels and overhangs to allow the building to receive daylight and minimize heat at the same time. Its design was enhanced by split-face, colored block used for its appearance, durability and suitability for the desert climate.

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  • ENR Southwest
  • Best Energy/Industrial Project
  • Southern Nevada Recycling Center

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Republic Services’ Southern Nevada Recycling Center Celebrated with Industry Facility of the Year Award
PR News Wire│ September 20, 2016

AUSTIN, Texas, Sept. 20, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Republic Services, Inc. (RSG) is pleased to announce that the National Waste and Recycling Association (NWRA) has named Republic Services’ Southern Nevada Recycling Center the winner of the Recycling Facility of the Year Award. The award was presented today at the NWRA’s annual Waste360 Recycling Summit in Austin, Texas.

“We are honored by this recognition,” said Tim Oudman, market vice president of Republic Services. “The Recycling Center could not have happened without the support of many local leaders and community partners. Together, we are enabling the Southern Nevada community and local businesses to achieve their sustainability goals for generations to come.”

The Southern Nevada Recycling Center is the largest and smartest residential recycling center in North America. It is capable of processing two million pounds of recyclable material per day, or 70 tons per hour, and is expected to double recycling capacity in the area. It uses several advanced recycling technologies, including five optical sorters which use 2D and 3D technologies to make material separation decisions in milliseconds.

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ALSO APPEARED IN:

Yahoo Finance │ September 20, 2016

3BL Media │ September 22, 2016

TOPIC

  • NWRA
  • MRF/Recycling Center
  • Facility of the Year

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Testimonials

Type of Transfer Stations
Waste Advantage Magazine│ September 2016

Transfer stations are designed and constructed in many shapes and sizes. Many methods to transfer waste have been implemented over the years from waste trucks to transfer trailers. Some of the many variations in transfer station facility designs include push pit, lift and load, surge pit and direct tip. Moving waste has also included many types of methods including loaders, excavators, knuckle booms and others. In this article, the discussion will be based upon a few of these options and their design-build differences. At the end of the day, it is important to work with an expert for evaluation of the transfer station operations and the decision regarding which option works best for the owner to cost-effectively transfer material through a facility.

Push Pit Transfer Station
A push pit transfer station’s name defines the method used. The facility is designed with an elevated tipping floor, typically about 15′ above the pit floor where the transfer trailer sits. Above the transfer trailer is an open hole in the floor roughly 45′ long x 7′ wide. Typically, push pit designs use a drive-thru pit in lieu of a back-in pit. Haul trucks and customers bring in the waste and deposit it directly onto the tipping floor. This facility typically uses a loader operator as well as a small excavator or knuckle boom within the footprint. The loader operator pushes the trash from the pile to the open hole and directly into the trailer. The knuckle boom then compacts the waste in the back of the trailer so as to ensure that they hit the maximum axle weights.
Typical load times for this method for trained operators can be as low as four to eight minutes.

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  • Transfer Stations
  • Types of Pits

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Testimonials

Hauling Company Facility Requirements: Basic Design Criteria and the Changing Work Environment
Waste Advantage Magazine│ August 2016

A hauling company is a big part of any waste company. It is where a majority of employees work from and directly affects the ability of the company to pick up customer trash every day.  A hauling company typically houses all of the route trucks (residential, commercial, roll-off), containers (roll-offs or household), mechanics, drivers, operations team (dispatch, supervisors, ops manager), back office and management. However, at the same time, this facility is not typically “revenue producing” because revenue is driven from tipping fees and not hauling contracts. That being said, it is important that these facilities are able to be built economically and operate safely and efficiently. In this day and age where waste companies are competing for employees, it is important to make sure facilities are nice, clean and somewhere people want to go to work every day. Quality drivers and mechanics are getting harder to come by, so it has become necessary to set a company apart from the pack by offering more amenities and a nice environment, pay more or offer unique benefits. This article will focus on the facility itself and what it should be focused on in terms of the facility design.

Site Location and Amenities

The site location and amenities are the most important and most difficult to arrange. When it comes to operations of the facility, the focus should begin on the site location within the community. The site needs to be properly zoned (which varies by state), have good access to highways or other major thoroughfares and be close to the “end of day” tipping site for collection trucks. In my opinion, these are the three most important factors in site selection because if these do not work, everything else becomes very difficult.

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  • Hauling Companies
  • Facility Requirements

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Testimonials

Family business emphasizes efficiency in design-build solutions for waste industry
US Builders Review│ Spring 2016

From concept to completion, Cambridge Companies Inc. provides high-quality design, consulting, construction and general contracting services throughout the United States. Located in Griffith, Indiana, Cambridge encompasses two branches of service. Its commercial side focuses on general contracting and design-build projects primarily in the commercial and industrial sectors throughout northwest Indiana and Chicago. The company also serves the national solid waste community by providing essential transfer station construction services.

Success through reputation

Founded in 1988 by Ray Eriks, Cambridge Construction and Development operated throughout northwest Indiana and northeast Illinois as a general contracting firm specializing in commercial and industrial design-build projects. In 1998, Linda and Ray Eriks introduced Cambridge Builders Inc., which expanded Cambridge’s service area countrywide. The companies merged to form Cambridge Companies Inc. in January 2006.

With an unparalleled knowledge of the waste industry, Cambridge thrives on its ability to analyze a facility and then identify and develop solutions for each client. As a design-build firm and general contractor, Cambridge manages the entire construction process from the initial design phase through complete construction. Since 2002, the company has maintained three full-time, in-house architects, allowing each client direct access to input on the design and formulation of their design solution.

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  • Cambridge Companies

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SWANA Presents Excellence Awards for Landfills, WTE, Recycling and Collection and WTE
Waste360 │ July 14, 2016

The Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA), Silver Spring, Md., announced the winners of the 1994 Recycling Excellence Awards Program at its International Solid Waste Exposition in San Antonio, Texas, August 1 to 4, 1994. Award categories included collection, recycling, landfills and waste-to-energy.

The Collection Excellence Program Award recognizes communities whose collection system and transfer operations are technically sound and economically feasible. The applications were divided into three categories: technology and systems ap-plication, safety programs and spec- ial programs.

The winners were the Palm Beach County Solid Waste Authority’s North County Transfer Station in Juniper, Fla., and the Seminole County Transfer Station in Long-wood, Fla.

The Recycling Excellence Program Award recognizes recycling programs that have been carefully developed and implemented through a cooperative effort between the implementing agency or company and the community.

The programs were classified into three categories: collection, source reduction and complete programs. They were also judged by population category: fewer than 100,000, between 100,000 and 500,000 and greater than 500,000.

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  • SWANA
  • Excellence Award, Bronze
  • Transfer Station

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Solid Waste Association awards Cambridge Cos.
Recycling Today │ July 12, 2016

The Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA), Silver Spring, Maryland, has announced that Indiana-based Cambridge Cos. has been named the winner of the SWANA Bronze Excellence Award in the Transfer Station category. The award will be presented at SWANA’s annual Wastecon, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2016, in Indianapolis.

“The city of Cape Girardeau Corporate Circle Solid Waste Transfer Station (SWTS) is a very unique project,” says Jeffrey Eriks, chief business development officer for Cambridge Cos. “Although challenged at many points, The city, Republic Services and Cambridge Cos. used creativity, cooperation and commitment to complete a stellar design/build project.”

Griffith, Indiana based Cambridge Companies, which designs and builds waste and treatment and recycling facilities, has been named the winner of the SWANA Bronze Excellence Award in the Transfer Station category.

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  • SWANA
  • Excellence Award
  • Bronze
  • Transfer Station

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Experience Cambridge

The Power of a Team
Waste Advantage Magazine │ June 2016

Identifying the need for a new project is an important first step for any type of development project. But how is a rough idea translated into a completed facility? Many professionals, from several disciplines, working together will be needed to assemble documents and approvals to get to the construction phase. Team members will vary based on the type of project and requirements of the local community. No matter the size or make-up of the team, communication is critical to the success of the design phase and one person on the project needs to be the liaison between all parties to pull everything together. In our experience, this is typically the lead architect or the design/build firm since they manage the other team members and work closely with the owner.

Typically, projects will involve Environmental Permitting, Owner Representatives, Lead Architect/Structural Engineer/MEP Engineer, Civil Engineer, Legal (for zoning and land use issues), Public (community) Engagement, Local Building and Planning Departments and an Experienced Design/Build Construction Firm. How this team is assembled and how well it functions will be key to project execution and completing the process in an efficient manner. The areas of critical performance for these teams include Land Use and Zoning, Community Engagement, Site Planning and Environmental Permitting, Construction Documents and Project Execution. We will go through a few of these team members and their important roles. This list will not be all encompassing and may grow or shrink based on your specific project.

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  • Teamwork
  • Solid Waste Projects

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City cuts ribbon on new transfer station, sewer plant
Southeast Missourian │ May 24, 2016

Ribbon cuttings for the city of Cape Girardeau Public Works Department’s new transfer station and wastewater treatment plant took place on Monday morning.

Cape Girardeau Mayor Harry Rediger, city manager Scott Meyer and public works director Steve Cook made remarks at both facilities, constructed as part of an effort to comply with new regulations from the Department of Natural Resources.

In his opening remarks, Rediger said the new facilities create a “campus of infrastructure that will serve our citizens for many years to come.”

Transfer station

It was well known among the city staff and city council a new transfer station was needed, Rediger said.

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  • Cape Girardeau Transfer Station

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New Transfer Station and Wastewater Treatment Plant
Southeast Missourian │ May 23, 2016

Ribbon cutting events are held at the city of Cape Girardeau’s new transfer station and wastewater treatment plant Monday, May 23, 2016 in Cape Girardeau.

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  • Cape Girardeau Transfer Station

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Testimonials

Tailoring Your MRF to the Task at Hand
MSW Management │ May 20, 2016

According to Brian Schellati, Van Dyk Recycling Solution’s director of business development, “Not only does equipment have its own required routine maintenance, but how the equipment is laid out will determine material handling logistics. How easily materials flow through a plant from tip floor to processing, to product storage, to baling can make or break a plant’s chance at success.”

Caterpillar application specialists always work with the mantra of “task, tool, machine,” notes Tom Griffith, machine/application specialist for waste.

Managing municipal solid waste is more than landfilling: publicity, education, engineering, long-term planning, and landfill gas waste-to-energy are specialties needed in today’s complex environment. We’ve created a handy infographic featuring 6 tips to improve landfill management and achieve excellence in operations. 6 Tips for Excellence in Landfill Operations. Download it now!

A material recovery facility (MRF) needs to be designed to handle inbound, recovery, and outbound loads to meet specific production requirements and efficiencies while keeping costs low, he adds.

One important design factor: inbound storage space adequate for tonnage per day as well as peaks, says Griffith. “Peak outbound—depending on who owns trucking—sometimes is not the same as peak inbound. Inbound stockpile needs to be close to whatever machine is feeding the sorting lines,” he adds.

Be it a wheel loader, rubber-tired excavator/material handler, or excavator, the stockpile should be situated so that the machine loading the feed lines has minimal movement and can pick, sort, discard, and feed the lines for needed production per hour, notes Griffith.

“At the same time, there needs to be room for discarded materials—non-recyclables—that the sorting machine will place in a separate pile to be pushed to outbound haul vehicles to take to the landfill with minimal movement and distance,” he adds.

Griffith notes that for quick cycles and support work, consider: ceiling height, free space with few if any obstacles, easy access in and out to discard bunkers, conveyor line cleanup, width and length of load-out hole, and type of load out, such as below grade, half separation, or same level.

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  • MRF/Recycling Center

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Experience Cambridge

Leachate Treatment Facilities: Teamwork for a Turnkey Facility
Waste Advantage Magazine│ April 2016

Leachate treatment facilities are a key part of any landfill design. The treatment of the liquids generated through the process and life of a landfill are necessary in many locations prior to discharge. When beginning to research methods and options for treating liquids, it’s important to involve experts in the analyzation and treatment of the waste to evaluate the liquid and determine the correct treatment method. The determined method is standardly based on the leachate’s current make-up and the end result required by the receiving party. These specialists will typically begin with a pilot study to develop a “basis of design” for what needs to be done to treat the liquid and what equipment should be used. This pilot study will generally look at the needs for today and project what the future needs might be in the years to come, knowing both the volume and makeup will change. This information can be used to select a process equipment supplier and add your design/build team immediately following in order for them to work together to develop the design for the facility, factoring in the equipment, safety, efficiency, storage and durability for the application. The quantities of liquid also need to be understood in order to properly size the system and the tanks that will be needed to store the untreated and treated liquid prior to treatment or discharge. All of these factors will help determine the amount of space that will be required to construct the plant. The team tasked to work on this project will need to take into account some key factors including the location, interior features, building design and safety.

Location

The location of the new facility is important since it needs to be placed where the leachate lines can come together and the discharge line can also be easily accessed. The leachate treatment facility should be located in an area where future landfill cells are not affected and there is enough ground area to accommodate future growth and expansion of the system.

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  • Leachate Treatment Facility
  • Teamwork

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Experience Cambridge

Landfill Maintenance Shops: Determine Needs Before Designing
Waste Advantage Magazine│ March 2016

Maintenance shops are sometimes a necessary component at a landfill site and can serve multiple functions. The main function of this facility is to house and maintain landfill equipment such as dozers, compactors and haul trucks, and is commonly co-located with your landfill employees break room, locker room and offices. This article will focus on the maintenance shop as a key component in keeping your equipment functioning properly. Due to the type of equipment used at a landfill, the design of the shop should include accommodations for the equipment as well as a safe environment for employees to perform equipment maintenance. One of the major factors in determining the type of shop construction is how long the maintenance shop will be left in this location. Oftentimes, maintenance shops are built on future landfill cells and need to be moved in the not-so-distant-future to allow for the cell expansion. The shop should be kept in close proximity to the working face in order to limit the distance from the work area to where the equipment will be maintained.

Shop Structures and Environment

Due to the nature of how long maintenance shops will be in the same location, they are constructed out of various types of materials and structural systems. Materials for maintenance shops can range from fabric, to steel, to wood pole barns or stacked shipping containers with a roof installed. One of the advantages to temporary structures such as pole barns, fabric buildings and sea cans is that they don’t require concrete foundations. This is advantageous if the structure will not be in this location long-term and can help to reduce costs on foundations. A much more solid and permanent solution is a metal building with concrete foundation, as this will provide a solid structure for 50 years or more. The decision for a temporary or permanent facility depends on the overall function of the facility. Questions such as how long the maintenance shop will be in a specific location, what is the budget and in what kind of climate will the facility will be located should be asked prior to contracting a company to design and/or build the maintenance shop. These factors are important to know but don’t necessarily affect how the building will be used.

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  • Landfill Maintenance Shop
  • Design

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Experience Cambridge

Containing costs
Recycling Today│ February 2016

When I was first asked to contribute this article on avoiding overspending during the design/build of a recycling facility, my initial thoughts were on discussing the incidental items, such as thickness of concrete, types of overhead doors and other items along those lines. While these items do play an important part in designing your facility, I believe controlling the “costs” of your new recycling facility hinge more on site selection, efficient and safe design, durability and designing an efficient building layout that is “right-sized.”

We like to look at recycling facilities in two different ways. You have the initial capital outlay to purchase the site, to design and build the facility and to install the equipment. Then you have the ongoing operating costs of the facility, which include your employees and all the building- and equipment-related operations and maintenance costs.

I will briefly dive into how a material recovery facility (MRF) owner can save money in both of these areas—initial capital outlay and ongoing operations—and how to apply these suggestions to your next project.

SAVING AT THE OUTSET

The major factors at play here are the site selection and the building size. The site itself can cost an owner millions during the construction phase. Not fully vetting a site before purchase can lead to many unforeseen costs down the road. This also varies based on whether you purchase an existing building or a clear site. Existing buildings can be full of issues, such as too many interior columns that get in the way of the equipment, improperly sized electrical services, insufficient water pressure to take the fire sprinkler system up to code, concrete that is not designed to carry the loads required, improper clear heights within the building for the equipment or operations and many others. Along with these issues, environmental issues, such as asbestos or other contaminants, also could be present.

Clear sites could pose issues such as poor soils that require overexcavation and replacement, poor traffic patterns arising from how the site is shaped, poor access to highways and other major access points, the grade change may be too great for a building of the size you need and, lastly, you could have bad neighbors.

All of these factors can cost MRF owners excessive capital that they didn’t plan on when they started the process and built pro formas to obtain approvals for their projects.  

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  • MRFs/Recycling Centers

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Republic Services’ Southern Nevada Recycling Center features equipment from CP Group
Recycling Today│ January 5, 2016

San Diego-based CP Group, in partnership with Phoenix-based Republic Services Inc., unveiled what they describe as a “state-of-the-art” recycling center in a November 2015 grand opening ceremony. The grand opening welcomed more than 450 attendees to tour the facility and education center.

The 110,000-square-foot Southern Nevada Recycling Center has been dubbed by Republic Services as “the largest and smartest residential recycling center in North America.”

Site development constructed by Cambridge Cos., Griffith, Indiana, and equipment installation by CP Group was completed in a remarkable 12 months, from the groundbreaking in November 2014 to the grand opening at the end of 2015, CP Group says. CP Group engineered the residential and commercial single-stream processing system, capable of processing 2 million pounds of recyclables daily, or 70 tons per hour. This capability is expected to double recycling capacity throughout Clark County, Nevada, the company says.

The facility features two 35-tons-per-hour sorting lines for operational flexibility, according to a news release issued by CP Group. Republic is able to process material on one or both lines and can bypass certain parts of the system when processing different material types.

While the center largely will process residential recyclables, it also has the ability process commercial and industrial streams. This built-in flexibility allows the system to adapt as the composition of the recycling stream evolves, according to CP Group.

“There are scales through the system,” Terry Schneider, president and CEO of CP Group, says. “[The incoming tonnage] can be calculated on a constant basis.”

He adds that shaft speeds and screen angles can be modified based on this information. “It gives you a lot of flexibility.”  

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  • So. NV Recycling Center

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Testimonials

MRF: Safety and Efficiency
MSW Management│ January/February 2016

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) points out on its website that while recycling is good for the environment, it can be dangerous for workers. Certain materials in the wastestream directly pose hazards to workers. Additional hazards include vehicle traffic, moving machine parts, unexpected machine startup, lifting injuries, slips, trips, and falls.

There have been six baler-related deaths or injuries at a recycling or waste management facilities nationwide since 2000, according to OSHA. In the latest, a worker at a Winter Garden, FL, recycling operation was killed while trying to clear a jam in a massive cardboard compactor and bundling machine.

Managing municipal solid waste is more than landfilling: publicity, education, engineering, long-term planning, and landfill gas waste-to-energy are specialties needed in today’s complex environment. We’ve created a handy infographic featuring 6 tips to improve landfill management and achieve excellence in operations. 6 Tips for Excellence in Landfill Operations. Download it now!

The Changing Wastestream Complicates the Situation

“An increase in small cardboard is noticeable as consumers are increasingly ordering online and have goods shipped to their house,” says Rutger Zweers, Stadler USA sales director, who adds that material composition strongly changes per location, city or state.

“Newspaper is dropping fast due to online news sources; this is the biggest driving factor for planning future systems,” explains Brian Schellati, director of business development for VAN DYK Recycling Solutions. “We see a slight increase happening with office-type paper as more home offices become established, but this is very gradual.”

Schellati also notes a “definite increase” in cardboard due to more online shopping, “but at a much slower rate than the decline of newsprint.”

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  • MRF/Recycling Centers
  • Safety
  • Efficiency

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