Cambridge Companies contributes and participates in design and construction related articles within the waste industry.

View articles, press releases, and advertisements from 2015 below.

Key:

icon_newsArticles

icon_news

Press Releases

Experience CambridgeCambridge Penned

TestimonialsCambridge Contributed

Republic’s Production of Jack and the Bale Stack
Forester Daily News│ November 18, 2015

Last week (November 14th) I headed up Interstate 15 to North Las Vegas for the grand opening of Republic Waste Services’ brand new Southern Nevada Recycling Center. Whatever vision I held prior to my arrival was completely crushed by both the size and complexity of campus, but even what remained paled by comparison with the plant’s amazing throughput, an accomplishment driven home by the sign on the facility’s Learning Center wall regarding the facility’s daily output.

“Wow,” I thought, dragging from my memory blank the layers of our surrounding atmosphere.

On one level, I know that ordinarily there is no way that at 70 tons per hour you can turn 2 million pounds of recyclable materials into 62 miles of 5-foot bales, “but this is Las Vegas, which similar to Jack’s magic beans has its own rules,” I reminded myself.

Still, 360,000 feet was five times higher than any of the magic fighters operating out of nearby Nellis Air Force Base could attain, so I asked one of the company’s representatives, who patiently explained that the elevation they had in mind is that of the Stratosphere Hotel on The Strip.

The Stratosphere Hotel is 1,149 feet tall from the base to the very top. Thus it requires 460 five-foot-wide bales to allow Jack to climb the 2,298 feet to hit the jackpot and dispatch the giant…a rather liberal retelling of the tale.

My anxiety curbed by the realization that we were talking about a bale stack slightly short of a half-mile high—a huge accomplishment no matter how you cut it—I was able to turn my attention to the features that make Republic’s newest and largest residential recycling center the company’s flagship operation.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • So NV Recycling Center

[Back to Top]

GRAND OPENING! Republic Services’ Southern Nevada Recycling Center
PR Log │ November 12, 2015

Cambridge Companies, waste facility design-build experts based in Griffith, IN, has completed construction for the Southern Nevada Recycling Center in North Las Vegas, Nevada. The Grand Opening is being held Thursday, November 12, 2015 inside the recycling facility. Cambridge Companies’ has over 20 years’ experience building waste facilities across the United States. The Southern Nevada Recycling Center’s construction began in November 2014. Cambridge Companies worked with local subcontractors throughout the 12 month project to prepare for the Grand Opening occurring today.

Cambridge Companies is thrilled to have worked with Republic Services throughout the project. The Southern Nevada Recycling Center boasts 110,000 square feet with highly advance recycling technologies installed by equipment manufacturer The CP Group. This facility is the largest residential “All-in-One” vice single-stream recycling center in the nation and will double residential recycling capacity in southern Nevada.

Jeff Eriks, Chief Business Development Officer for Cambridge said, “The Southern Nevada Recycling Center has been a dream to work on and we are happy to have been able to partner with Republic Services, The CP Group, and all the local subcontractors that made this facility come to life. Cambridge Companies is excited about the opportunities it offers the region.”

Read More…

TOPIC

  • So NV Recycling Center

[Back to Top]

Experience Cambridge

Best Practices: Material Resource Facility, pages 25-26
Waste Advantage Magazine│ November 2015

When designing a material recourse facility (MRF) or recycling center, it is always important that certain factors are considered as they will affect the long-term operations of the facility. A few of these factors including products/commodities, system and building throughput, outbound material, maintenance, safety and site considerations are discussed in this article to help during the planning process. Many other factors that are not included here need to be considered and should be discussed prior to designing the facility. In this article, we discuss key factors that we feel are extremely important in the process of designing a MRF or recycling center.

Products and/or Commodities

This first section focuses on the actual product and/or commodity being processed at a MRF. This is the center of the facility, so it is important it is designed around this factor. The make-up of the material or characteristics will lead to the equipment design as it needs to be efficient in processing the material. It is necessary to be able to remove the right thing at the right time and have the bunker sized appropriately to handle the material. The “evolving ton” and how your market will change in the coming years needs to be understood. This will affect how the equipment designer sets the equipment up to morph in the future and handle the growing and changing products received.

Along with the product itself, it is necessary to understand how it comes into the building. What is the product flow? Are there peaks and valleys? Does it come in co-mingled or do loads come in clean and what kinds of trucks bring these into the facility? These factors affect how a facility is designed to handle these different ebbs and flows as well as the different types of trucks and how they tip. It is also important that you make sure trucks can get into and out of the facility as expeditiously as possible. This will be important to keep your costs low (if you haul your own recyclables) or to keep third-party haulers happy so that they do not spend time waiting at a facility. If their trucks can keep moving through the facility, they will likely keep coming back. Lastly, how does the product leave the facility? Is it sent out loose or in bales or a combination of both? Having the ability to understand who is taking the various products will allow you to understand how to accommodate the outbound product and vehicles.

System and Building Throughput

Next we will discuss the throughput of the system and building. Once the process of materials is understood, we move on to the system itself. The equipment company contracted will work to help analyze material and develop the parameters of the system and specifications of what it will need to accomplish in a given day to process the material and keep floors empty at the end of the day while also keeping residuals low.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • Best Practices
  • MRF/Recycling Center
  • Design

[Back to Top]

Construction ahead of schedule for transfer station
Southeast Missourian│ October 21, 2015

Two months after the groundbreaking ceremony, Cape Girardeau public works officials say construction of the new transfer station is ahead of schedule.

For more than five years, a new transfer station has been high on the city’s list of capital-improvements projects.

But it wasn’t until an agreement with Republic Services the city could make the project happen. The pact was formally approved by the city council in December.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • Cape Girardeau Transfer Station

[Back to Top]

Testimonials

Winning In Vegas, pages 34-35
Waste Management World│ September-October 2015

Southern Nevada Recycling Center in North Las Vegas, Nevada is rapidly nearing completion.  This is an extraordinarily large project, developing a new state-of-the-art 100,000+ square foot (9300m2) recycling center that will enable Republic Services to further expand All-in-One-RecyclingTM throughout Southern Nevada.  The key players include the owner, Republic Services, the design-build general contractor Cambridge Companies, and recycling equipment manufacturer and supplier, CP Group.

Site Work  

The site work is largely complete.  Excess soil material has been removed from the site, curbs and gutters are installed, and the site is ready for asphalt.  The perimeter masonry fence is 75% finished and is expected to be fully complete imminently.  In addition, plantings for landscaping are under way and the building and site signage installation will begin shortly.

Facility, Equipment & Office Progress  

The construction of the Process, Tipping, and Bale storage buildings is functionally complete with only final connections to be made for sprinkler installation around equipment and viewing platforms.  Minor work remains for safety signage, final sprinkler installation and minor coordination of building related items for the equipment installation.

CP Group is on site and installing equipment.  The container and screen lines are in place and the placement of the three balers has begun.  Two balers are in place and the third will come online shortly after the facility start-up.  The presort line is in position with the glass and overall system installation complete to begin the commissioning process.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • So. NV Recycling Center

[Back to Top]

City breaks ground on new trash transfer station
Southeast Missourian│ August 10, 2015

The topic of trash and its disposal may not be an interesting to many, but that’s not the case with Cape Girardeau officials. Those attending the groundbreaking ceremony Monday morning for a new multi-use transfer station were all smiles.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • Cape Girardeau Transfer Station

[Back to Top]

Cape council give final OK on new transfer station
Southeast Missourian│ August 4, 2015

The road to a new transfer station in Cape Girardeau has required approval of several measures by the city council, but Monday’s approved agreement was the last step before work begins. City staff long have placed the project among the city’s top capital-improvement needs, and several factors fell in place to help make it financially possible.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • Cape Girardeau Transfer Station

[Back to Top]

Experience Cambridge

Municipal Solid Waste Projects and the Design-Build Process, pages 28-30
Waste Advantage Magazine│ August 2015 Issue

Solid waste construction projects present unique challenges for end users, specifically municipalities. A design-build approach can help smooth this process. Challenges come from many areas and include, but are not limited to: community impacts, permitting, transparency in process, cost control and successful implementation. This approach is being used for a new transfer station in Missouri.

Municipal projects tend to be a lightning rod for attention, even more so when it is a solid waste project with community impact. A high priority for these is often to mitigate the environmental effects of the proposed project, as well as plans to address existing concerns on the site. The design-build process adds value in its ability to integrate design and project delivery into one team. In this area, the city, design, and build teams can work together with stakeholders to identify areas of concern and propose remediation measures. Where the typical design-bid-build approach prescriptively dictates one solution, the design-build approach engages the procurement portion of the build team to get accurate pricing data and determine the schedule impacts of the proposed options, assigning real-time cost/schedule impacts to the proposed solutions. This better informs the decision makers to help them make the best choice from a quality, schedule and cost standpoint. At the Missouri Transfer Station, the project team decided to situate the building with its doors away from two adjoining roads and towards an adjacent sewage treatment plant. In addition, the site channels all storm water to a single detention basin with one outfall to improve monitoring. By conducting the proper due-diligence and design vetting during the pre-design stages, the final product best reflects the goals of the project as well as remaining mindful of the schedule and budget.

Environmental Permitting

The environmental permitting of a solid waste project has the potential to have a major impact to both the schedule and final design of a solid waste project. In keeping with the design-build approach, a permitting consultant is brought in as a project partner from day one to coordinate the environmental permitting work. With this approach, the design development and environmental permitting work can proceed on parallel tracks, rather than sequentially. With the Missouri Transfer Station, the permitting consultant was able to fast-track permitting with the state’s Department of Natural Resources. This allowed for reviews and comments on submittals to be expedited. In addition, the consultant’s involvement on weekly owner/design meetings allows for feedback and direction that helps keep the final design in line with what is permitted, as well as to vet any proposed modifications to the permitting submittals that might come up in the course of the design.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • Municipal Solid Waste
  • Design-Build Process

[Back to Top]

Testimonials

Bringing Safety and Ambition to Recycling, pages 36-37
DDC Journal │ Summer 2015

Ground broke last November on the Southern Nevada Recycling Center, a new recycling center in North Las Vegas that, once completed, will be the largest of its kind in the nation.  Cambridge Companies, a design/build construction firm based in Griffith, Indiana, is building the center for Republic Services.

This project is the latest in a long line of waste management developments Cambridge Companies has taken on over the last two decades.

“We’ve been dealing almost primarily with the waste industry for 20 years now,” says Jeff Eriks, Chief Business Development Officer at Cambridge Companies.  “So when we are building new facilities, we pretty much know what we need to do and how to make them more durable and more efficient.  We can meet their needs exactly.”

According to Eriks, Republic Services engaged the firm in 2012 to start developing a plan for the center.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • Cambridge Companies

[Back to Top]

Testimonials

Las Vegas Mega Materials Recovery Facility (MRF): Construction Update
Waste Management World │ June 5, 2015

Construction work is progressing on the Las Vegas 265,000 tons (240,000 tonnes) single stream recycling facility with a completion date slated for the end of this year.

This is a large project to develop a new 110,000 square foot recycling center that will increase single stream recycling volumes in Clark County Nevada. Cambridge Construction is the General Contractor and CP Group is the equipment designer and supplier. The project is nearing its halfway mark.

The design/build team at Cambridge Companies has reported that progress at Republic Services’ Southern Nevada Recycling Complex in North Las Vegas is proceeding at “breakneck pace”.

Several portions of the site work are mostly complete, including the mass grading, building pad preparation and road bed installation. The site is crossed by several washes, and work to install the concrete box culverts and headwalls to cross these are in progress.

Notable challenges and obstacles included working with an on-site flood plain that could flood in storm events, removing unsuitable soils, and hard dig in caliche within the areas being excavated. The installation of the domestic water lines, fire lines, and site electric conduits has started. Connections to the City utilities will be completed in the next month.

The work on the tipping, bale and process areas is currently the highest priority on the critical path. To this goal, the building structural concrete is 95% complete, the building structural steel frame is 60% complete, and the remaining structural frame will be erected in the first half of May. The portions of the building over the equipment have been prioritized for completion to allow CP to start as early as practical.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • So. NV Recycling Center

[Back to Top]

Testimonials

Cambridge Companies – Griffith Construction Company Making a Name in Faraway Places, pages 76-77
Northwest Indiana Business Quarterly │ Spring 2015

As companies go, Cambridge Companies of Griffith isn’t exactly the most well known in Northwest Indiana.

But while folks around here may not have the 26-year-old company’s name on the tip of their tongues, Cambridge is making a name for itself nationally, especially after taking on the largest recycling center in the state of Nevada.

“It’s definitely our biggest project to date. It’s the largest single-stream facility for recycling in the country,” says Jeff Eriks, vice president of project development for the family-owned-operated Cambridge Companies Inc. “We’ve been working on this project for more than two years now. We’re happy to be part of this.”

The 110,000-square-foot transfer station is being built for Republic Services Inc. and sits on some 18 acres in North Las Vegas. In this project, Cambridge Companies assisted in the design of the building’s layout and is now overseeing construction of the facility.

Some 80 construction workers will build the facility which will employ 180 full-time workers when it opens for business in fall 2015. Construction started in November 2014. When complete, the transfer station will be able to process 70 tons an hour (420 tons per day)—nearly double what a comparable processing station can normally handle. Employees will sort through and remove garbage, metals and other debris from a conveyor belt that is 10 feet wide.

The collected 1,300 pounds of bales of paper, plastic and metals is seen as a commodity and shipped to domestic and international markets in less than a day.

While the popular saying is “What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas,” this project is being talked about.

“It is fitting that a recycling complex of this magnitude is coming to Las Vegas,” says Tim Oudman, Area President of Republic Services. “Southern Nevada is home to considerable natural beauty, and this community is deeply committed to sustainability. We are truly proud to invest in a recycling complex that will help preserve the local environment for future generations, and enable customers to meet or exceed their recycling goals.”

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • Cambridge Companies

[Back to Top]

Testimonials

Build a MRF
MSW Management │ May 2015

When a municipality or a hauler wants to build a new materials recycling facility, it has to consider many aspects prior to construction. Before breaking ground, letting to bid, and even issuing Requests for Proposals (RFPs), many consult experts to help define their needs, as well as the potential of, and for, a material recovery facility (MRF).

Bob Rella and Deb Frye, senior vice presidents at HDR Engineering—national practice leaders for solid waste facilities, specializing in structural/civil and mechanical, respectively—have worked with many clients, providing oversight and helping develop projects. Their recommendations are independent of vendors, but, because of their experience in the industry, they are able to anticipate vendor input and modify based on the vendor selected.

First, says Frye, a site must be chosen. “We search for available property, taking into account the minimum number of acres needed,” she says.

Rella adds, “The site drives [the plan]. There may be unusable portions due to wetlands, for example. Each one is unique.”

Site Unseen

It’s important to understand the realities of the site, agrees Evan Williams, architect with Cambridge Companies. He mentions a project in Las Vegas where part of the property was in a flood zone. “We couldn’t do anything there,” he says.

It’s important to do a proper site assessment and know the site’s history. “You have to be aware of contamination issues, buried structures, and the impact on the surrounding properties,” explains Williams. “You don’t want groundwater issues, either.”

Pits for equipment can run 9 feet deep, with footings as deep as 11 feet. An area with a high water table could pose problems.

Access to highways, proximity to collection routes, and even the type of road material, which must be capable of handling heavy truck weights, are things to consider in site selection. Access to public transportation is also relevant because some employees may rely on it.

That same Nevada project encountered access issues due to high traffic on the main road, and because the site fronts onto an industrial street, a completely enclosable building had to be oriented to keep wind and sight lines away from the tip area. Best practices dictate that the doors are not visible from the road and the doors are oriented according to prevailing winds. Remember to be a good neighbor by taking into consideration noise, odor, and traffic generated by the facility,

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • MRFs/Recycling Centers

[Back to Top]

Republic’s State-of-the-Art Processing Center: Expanding Recycling Across Southern Nevada, pages 51-53
Waste Advantage Magazine │ May 2015

Republic Services, Inc. (Phoenix, AZ) is an industry leader in U.S. nonhazardous recycling and solid waste. Through its subsidiaries, Republic’s collection companies, transfer stations, recycling centers and landfills focus on providing reliable environmental services and solutions for commercial, industrial, municipal and residential customers. Republic and its employees believe in protecting the planet and applying common sense solutions to customers’ waste and recycling challenges and needs.

Cambridge Companies (Griffith, IN) is a design/build construction company located in the suburbs of Chicago. They have been in business since 1986 and have been focusing on the waste industry since the early 1990s. Cambridge has completed more than 100 waste facility design/build projects to date. While Cambridge is located in Chicago, they serve clients throughout the U.S. currently carrying licenses in 30 states, with the ability to add as needed.

As a world leader in recycling separation technology and sustainable solutions, CP Group (San Diego, CA) engineers, manufactures and installs some of the most technologically advanced material recovery facilities (MRFs) globally. Custom turnkey solutions for residential recycling, commercial and industrial processing, municipal solid waste processing, engineered fuel and more, are designed, manufactured and implemented by CP Group.

The Project

Republic Services has been serving the Las Vegas metro area for more than 20 years. With the increased participation in the residential recycling program across Southern Nevada, Republic had to expand their local processing capabilities. As part of the expansion, Republic will install dual 35 Tons per Hour (TPH) full single-stream systems to accommodate the volume in the local market. Once this is completed, it will result in the largest residential recycling center in the U.S. with the capability to process 70 TPH.

Republic had discussed the project with a few firms but, ultimately, engaged Cambridge in September 2012 to help develop the solution to their problem. Republic chose Cambridge because of their experience in the industry and recently completed projects together including the Lorain County Resource Recovery Center in Ohio and the Jacksonville, FL MRF. “Cambridge is excited to be partners with Republic Services on this industry-leading project and is looking forward to completing the design and construction for what will be North America’s largest residential recycling facility,” stated Jeff Eriks, Principal at Cambridge Companies, Inc.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • So. NV Recycling Center

[Back to Top]

Testimonials

Missouri City Building Waste Transfer Station
Waste360 │ April 15, 2015

Construction on the project will begin in August. Waste facility construction firm Cambridge Companies, based in Griffith, Ind., will design and build the facility, according to a news release. Cambridge will subcontract some of the construction work to local firms.

Evan Williams, Cambridge design project manager for the Cape Girardeau project, said the new operation also will have accommodations to support a small hauling facility.

The city last December signed a contract with Phoenix-based Republic Services Inc. in part to haul solid waste from the city transfer station to the company’s landfill. The agreement included a provision to operate its hauling operation and process all solid waste from that through a new city-owned multiuse transfer station.

The agreement also included a provision for Republic Services to operate its hauling operation and process all solid waste from that operation through a new city-owned multiuse transfer station. The revenue generated from the solid waste processed by the city from Republic’s hauling operation, as well as lease payments from the company for using city-owned facilities, will provide sufficient revenue to pay for the new facility without higher user fees, said Tim Gramling, Cape Girardeau, public works director.

Republic has its own hauling operation and operates out of a facility in Fruitland. The company hauls trash from residents around Cape Girardeau County and from businesses in Cape Girardeau and the surrounding county to its own transfer station. Under the recent agreement, Republic will close down the Fruitland facility and bring its trash collected in the city and county to Cape Girardeau’s transfer station.

Republic also will rent office space from the city, and revenue from that arrangement will pay for project costs.

The estimated total cost of the project–including professional design, permitting, construction management services and construction of the facility–is $3.87 million. But Gramling said he expects that number will decrease as design work evolves.

City finance director John Richbourg said Republic will pay $7.75 per ton for the trash they move through the transfer station, which will produce an estimated $143,375 per year. The lease agreement is $60,000 per year.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • Cape Girardeau Transfer Station

[Back to Top]

Testimonials

Republic Services reports on progress of Las Vegas MRF construction
Construction & Demolition Recycling │ April 3, 2015

Phoenix-based Republic Services Inc. says its Southern Nevada Recycling Complex is taking shape and on track to begin operations in the fall of 2015.

Republic Nevada Republic Services Mountain Area Director of Public Relations and Field Communications Tracy Skenandore says the material recovery facility (MRF) will be “the country’s largest recycling center.”

Contractor Cambridge Cos. has been erecting the facility’s steel frame, says Skenandore, while equipment vendor CP Group is preparing the sorting and processing equipment to be used at the MRF.

The recycling complex will include a new 110,000-square-foot building adjacent to an existing 88,000-square-foot facility.

The MRF “will serve more than 535,000 households throughout the area, including the cities of North Las Vegas, Las Vegas and Henderson, as well as Clark County,” according to a fact sheet distributed by Republic Services.

The Southern Nevada Recycling Complex will be able to process more than 265,000 tons of mixed recyclables each year, the company says, “constituting roughly 1,000 tons of mixed recyclables per day, or 70 tons per hour.”

Skenandore says Republic Services has posted a video to YouTube of the construction site shot by a video camera affixed to a drone.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • So. NV Recycling Center

[Back to Top]

Cambridge Companies & Cape Girardeau Team Up to Build Transfer Station
Building Indiana │ April 1, 2015

Cambridge Companies, waste facility design-build experts based in Griffith, IN, has been awarded the design-build project for Cape Girardeau, Missouri’s Transfer Station facility that handles the city’s solid waste before it is transported to the landfill. Cambridge Companies’ extensive experience building waste facilities over the past 20 years makes them an optimal choice for this project.  

Read More…

ALSO APPEARED IN:

Waste Dive April 6, 2015
Recycling Today April 5, 2015
Waste Advantage Magazine April 3, 2015

TOPIC

  • Cape Girardeau Transfer Station

[Back to Top]

Experience Cambridge

Transfer Station Maintenance to Defer Costly Repairs, pages 14-15
Waste Advantage Magazine │ April 2015 Issue

Transfer stations that are currently in operation have several factors that play into proper maintenance of the building in order to keep it functioning and avoid or defer costly repairs far into the future. The most important factor in running a transfer station is properly training your loader operator. A properly trained loader operator can help to stretch the lifespan of your tipping floor and push walls as well as manage traffic to help reduce accidents. These are not the only benefits your facility will see for spending the time and money to train loader operators. Your facility may also see maximized payloads, decreased loading times and reduced damage to over-the-road hauler’s vehicles and trailers through their loading process. It’s amazing the effects a good loader operator can have on a facility over the lifetime of their employment. We have all heard the stories of
individuals being injured by a loader at a transfer station; no one wants to see that happen, safety is top priority. Training and management are the best ways to avoid an unfortunate disaster (see Rubber Edged Loaders sidebar, page 15).

Consistent Maintenance

In terms of maintenance to your facility, we like to break them down into daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly and annual items. This allows you to produce a checklist for your transfer station manager that he or she can use to make sure the maintenance is kept up in order to maintain low operating costs. Negligence on many of these items will lead to costly repairs that could have been avoided by spending the proper amount of time on maintenance.

Daily Maintenance Tips

• Always remove materials from the floor at the end of a shift in order to meet most EPA guidelines. This also allows you the ability to do a quick visual inspection to ensure that you don’t see any damage as well as helps prevent fires within your building from waste;

• Make sure overhead (OH) doors are up all the way during hours of operation. This will help to ensure that they aren’t damaged by vehicles dumping in the facility;

• Make sure all safety signage and traffic control items are properly displayed and functioning;

• Make sure all directional lights and other indicators for the site visitors are working properly;

• All entrance gates should be open all the way to help prevent damage from being hit.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • Transfer Stations

[Back to Top]

Germann Road Transfer Station Build Completed by Cambridge Companies
Waste Management World │ March 11, 2015

Griffith, Indiana based Cambridge Companies, a construction firm with a focus on designing and building waste and recycling facilities, has completed work the Germann Road Transfer Station in Chandler, Arizona. The construction firm explained that the Transfer Station is owned and operated by Republic Services and has the capacity to process more than 420 tons (381 tonnes) of waste per day.

Read More…

ALSO APPEARED IN:

Forester Daily News  March 23, 2015
The Dumpster Co  March 13, 2015

TOPIC

  • Germann Road Transfer Station

[Back to Top]

Trash Hauling, Transfer Station Q&A from Twitter
City of Cape Girardeau │ January 14, 2015

(Questions submitted online via Twitter)

1. Were other haulers given a shot at this lucrative deal?

Of course! A Request for Proposals was published in August, we received four responses and each were duly evaluated. Republic was the one that met all of our needs.

2. Will this contract giving Republic management of the new station be open to renegotiation every fixed number of years?

The City will own and operate (manage) the new transfer station, not Republic. The 20-year contract with Republic allows them to lease office space in the new facility which will help offset design-build costs. The contract also sets the rates for them to haul trash away from Cape. Should unforeseen circumstances make the City or Republic unable to hold up their end of the deal, we can renegotiate.

3. Why in the world was Republic allowed to design the facility? They won’t own it. I can see their being a key partner in design, but being the designer themselves? We are paying for the construction!

Cambridge Companies, Inc. will design the facility under the authority of the City with input from the very knowledgeable professionals at Republic. The City will design a facility that will meet our needs now and accommodate the future, even if and when Republic is gone.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • Cape Girardeau Transfer Station

[Back to Top]

Cape Girardeau Transfer Station Project in Works
Southeast Missourian │ January 13, 2015

A project that has been among the top of Cape Girardeau’s list of major infrastructure needs for many years could soon be realized. Along with a police station, a transfer station has been identified as one of the city’s top priorities, but until recently officials were unable to identify a revenue stream.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • Cape Girardeau Transfer Station

[Back to Top]

Testimonials

Largest Recycling Center Breaks Ground in Nev.
Construction Equipment Guide │ January 10, 2015

As Len Christopher, general manager of Republic Services, put it, “There was a lot of room for improvement here.”

But now that is all so much old history. Crews began work in Nov. 2014 on what is slated to be the largest residential recycling facility in the nation. At 110,000 sq. ft. (10,219 sq m), the Southern Nevada Recycling Complex will double residential recycling capacity in the area and will have the capacity to process roughly 265,000 tons (240,403 t) on an annual basis. It is set to open in fall 2015 and is expected to eventually employ 180-full-time personnel.

“It is fitting that a recycling complex of this magnitude is coming to Las Vegas,” said Tim Oudman, area president of Republic Services. “Southern Nevada is home to considerable natural beauty, and this community is deeply committed to sustainability. We are truly proud to invest in a recycling complex that will help preserve the local environment for future generations, and enable customers to meet or exceed their recycling goals.”

The Chicago-based Cambridge Construction company is in charge of building the project, and is partnering with The CP Group of San Diego, which will install the recycling equipment.

Ninety-five percent of the building is pre-engineered steel, according to Jeff Eriks, a partner at Cambridge, a design build firm that has specialized in building waste-related facilities since 1986. It’s an extremely tall building, with roughly 40-ft. (12 m) tall eaves and consists of three separate pieces: the tipping building, where the material comes in; the processing building, where materials are processed and the bale storage building.

Read More…

icon_news

TOPIC

  • So. NV Recycling Center

[Back to Top]