Cambridge Companies contributes and participates in design and construction related articles within the waste industry.

View articles, press releases, and advertisements from 2009 & 2008 below.

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Low Wire Act
Waste360 │ March 2009

Finding new sites in high-density areas to build transfer stations is growing increasingly difficult. Resident concerns, limited availability of convenient industrial sites and traffic issues make it nearly impossible to get a site permitted in desirable locations. This was the case for Allied Waste, which has since merged with Phoenix-based Republic Services, when planning a new transfer station site in Northlake, Ill. Eventually, the company found an ideal location on a less-than-ideal construction site. To realize its vision of a high-profile, state-of-the-art transfer station, the company contacted Cambridge Construction, Griffith, Ind. The task was to design and construct a high-volume transfer station on one of the more challenging redevelopment sites along the I-294 corridor.

The site had changed hands many times. The only constant was the utility easement for the overhead power lines owned by Commonwealth Edison, Chicago. Typically, utility companies would not consider a site like this for light industrial use, but some inquiries revealed a willingness to make it happen. Allied, Cambridge, and Commonwealth Edison devised a plan to create a source of revenue from an underused and undesirable property. Moreover, the project would generate additional income for the city of Northlake.  Read More…

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  • Illinois Transfer Station

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Experience Cambridge

Expanding Into Your Already Too-Small Facility
Waste Advantage Magazine

Many facilities can be modified and upgraded at a much smaller cost than building a new facility. By following these five steps, you will know in about six weeks whether or not your changes, upgrades and budget are feasible and how it can affect your operations in a positive way.

Pat yourself on the back. You’ve grown your business 5 to 10 percent for the past several years. Your business is going great and the future outlook is bright. You’ve been so focused on working to grow your business that one day you wake up and realize that you’ve outgrown your facility. Now none of us have ever run into that issue, right? Unfortunately, many of us have and it isn’t an easy problem to fix. So what do you do? Do you have the capital or time to knock it down and start from scratch? What are your options and what is the best way to attack this problem? This article will focus on three solutions; however, not every option works for everyone.

Bite the bullet and design and build a brand new facility and abandon or sell the existing one—This is a costly way out.

Do nothing and modify your operations to fit what you have and deal with it until further notice—This is the most cost-effective alternative as far as capital is concerned, but maybe not operationally. This may be a short-term fix, but in the long run, operating inefficiently is going to cost more than correcting the issues and expanding your existing facility.

Evaluate what you have and your operations, and determine the feasibility to expand and/or modify your existing facility—This option is, in most cases a good fit, from both a capital and operational point of view. You can apply this problem solving process to hauling companies, landfill shops, offices, transfer stations and MRFs along with many other facilities. Read More…

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  • Facility Sizing

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Experience Cambridge

T-Harmony for Transfer Stations – Finding Your “Perfect Match”
Waste Advantage Magazine

“Right sizing” determines the right fit for you, selecting the building and site layout that best works for your operation, and custom designing it to your needs.

Transfer Station “Right Sizing” (design, location and aesthetics) is a similar comparison to a dating service. Sounds strange right? Well think about it, you need to know what is right for you, what individual needs you have, what your long term goals are, what you are willing to invest and what you are looking to get out of it.

The “Right Sizing”

What is “Right Sizing” when it comes to transfer station design? This is a loaded question. First, we need to start by thinking about this—to whom are we asking that question? Is our client a municipality, a large private company, or a smaller start up? What is their goal, a show place or statement about their community? Is the facility simply a “tool” to allow them to best manage and process their materials? Often the answer is based not on what they need, but what they want or can afford. Municipalities are often looking to make a statement. Cost is not the driving consideration, and therefore cost is not a prime factor in the design; so often in the past these facilities would be, well, all you can say is “ginormous” and very costly. Now, will this change with the severe downturn in the economy? Only time will tell.

Normally, most questions that come to mind when you think about the right sizing question relate to the size of the building. Think about this from a slightly different perspective. Shouldn’t right sizing really be about creating the total design and layout that is most cost effective? Think about the term “cost effective” and what we are really saying is “What is going to be the cost per ton to process material through the building?”

Read More…

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  • Transfer Station

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